Thursday, August 18, 2022

ਵਾਹਿਗੁਰੂ

spot_img











Smartwatch can sense if you are chopping veggies

New York, May 8, 2019-

Smartwatches, with a few tweaks, can detect a surprising number of things your hands are doing like helping your spouse with washing dishes, chopping vegetables or petting a dog, say researchers from Carnegie Mellon University.

By making a few changes to the smartwatch’s operating system, they were able to use its accelerometer to recognise hand motions and, in some cases, bio-acoustic sounds associated with 25 different hand activities at around 95 percent accuracy.

Those 25 activities (including typing on a keyboard, washing dishes, petting a dog, pouring from a pitcher or cutting with scissors) are just the beginning of what might be possible to detect, the researchers said.

“We envision smartwatches as a unique beachhead on the body for capturing rich, everyday activities,” said Chris Harrison, Assistant Professor in Human-Computer Interaction Institute (HCII) at Carnegie.

“A wide variety of apps could be made smarter and more context-sensitive if our devices knew the activity of our bodies and hands,” he added.

Just as smartphones now can block text messages while a user is driving, future devices that sense hand activity might learn not to interrupt someone while they are doing certain work with their hands.

Sensing hand activity also lends itself to health-related apps — monitoring activities such as brushing teeth, washing hands or smoking a cigarette.

“Hand-sensing also might be used by apps that provide feedback to users who are learning a new skill, such as playing a musical instrument, or undergoing physical rehabilitation,” the study noted.

Apps might alert users to typing habits that could lead to repetitive strain injury (RSI), or assess the onset of motor impairments such as those associated with Parkinson’s disease.

To reach this conclusion, Harrison and his team began their exploration of hand activity detection by recruiting 50 people to wear specially programmed smartwatches for almost 1,000 hours while going about their daily activities.

More than 80 hand activities were labeled in this way, providing a unique dataset.

For now, users must wear the smartwatch on their active arm, rather than the passive (non-dominant) arm where people typically wear wristwatches, for the system to work.

Future experiments will explore what events can be detected using the passive arm.

Harrison and HCII PhD student Gierad Laput presented the findings at “CHI 2019”, the Association for Computing Machinery’s conference on human factors in computing systems in Glasgow, Scotland.  (Agency)

- Advertisement -

Yes Punjab - TOP STORIES

Punjab News

Sikh News

Transfers, Postings, Promotions

- Advertisement -spot_img

Stay Connected

29,869FansLike
113,966FollowersFollow

ENTERTAINMENT

National

GLOBAL

OPINION

Gilli-Danda: Comeback of 75 indigenous sports – by Narvijay Yadav

Under the ‘Azadi Ka Amrit Mahotsav’ the central government has stepped up the plan to introduce 75 indigenous sports in all schools. The popular...

Is the world sliding into a Chernobyl-plus nuclear disaster in Ukraine? – by Sergei Strokan

New Delhi, Aug 13, 2022- Tensions around the Zaporozhye nuclear power plant in Ukraine reached a climax by the weekend, after three more missiles...

When careers are sacrificed for advertisement billboards and statistics – by Vinit Goenka

Back in 1859, Macaulay's education system came into effect intending to colonise education and create a class of anglicised Indians. Post-Independence, India tried to...

SPORTS

Health & Fitness

Rise in pregnancy-related complications during Covid pandemic

New York, Aug 13, 2022- Covid-19 has caused unprecedented stressors as a new study showed a rise in pregnancy-related complications during the pandemic. The study, published in the journal JAMA Network Open, assessed how pregnancy-related complications and obstetric outcomes changed during Covid compared to pre-pandemic. Looking at the relative changes in the mode of delivery, rates of premature births and mortality...

Gadgets & Tech

error: Content is protected !!